Shockbottle 100 Round Case Gauge Bare
100 round case gauge Canada 9mm
 
(2 reviews)  

Our price: CA$145.00

RRP: CA$155.00 save 6%
SKUCG9100S
Weight2.20 lbs

Shockbottle 100 Round Case Gauge Bare

Case gauging your ammunition is absolutely vital to the performance of your gun at a competition. The primary reason for malfunctions is ammunition that has not been properly gauged. This normally time consuming process can be cut down to minutes with the Shockbottle 100 round case gauge. Using a 100 round gauge almost makes the process fun!

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Shockbottle Canada

Shockbottle 100 Round Case Gauges - Bare Aluminum

Our gauges are reamed with minimum-spec (or close to minimum) SAAMI chambering reamers. The way SAAMI specifications work, a maximum-spec round will fit into a minimum-spec chamber. However, most manufacturers ream their chambers with SAAMI maximum-size chambering reamers so that as the reamers wear down, the chambers are still 'in spec'. Some manufacturers start even larger in the name of reliability (these are often the same ones referred to as having "acceptable combat accuracy" in reviews)

Thus, given variances in brass and reloading dies and your chamber, rounds that are beyond SAAMI maximum ammunition size may still fit in your chamber.

Since we don't know what size your chamber is, we make the gauge holes to the minimum size so anything that fits the gauge is pretty much guaranteed to fit your chamber, even if it gets a bit dirty.

100-Round Case Gauge FAQs

My ammunition fits in my gun but doesn't fit in your gauge. What gives?

In a nutshell: it's better to reject a few good rounds than let a bad one through.

In detail:

Our gauges are reamed with minimum-spec (or close to minimum) SAAMI chambering reamers. The way SAAMI specifications work, a maximum-spec round will fit into a minimum-spec chamber. However, most manufacturers ream their chambers with SAAMI maximum-size chambering reamers so that as the reamers wear down, the chambers are still 'in spec'. Some manufacturers start even larger in the name of reliability (these are often the same ones referred to as having "acceptable combat accuracy" in reviews)

Thus, given variances in brass and reloading dies and your chamber, rounds that are beyond SAAMI maximum ammunition size may still fit in your chamber.

Since we don't know what size your chamber is, we make the gauge holes to the minimum size so anything that fits the gauge is pretty much guaranteed to fit your chamber, even if it gets a bit dirty.

If a few rounds don't fit the gauge, toss that into the 'practice' pile or 'check with barrel' pile. In addition, if you load lead and coated-lead bullets, they are often .001" or more over the nominal bore size. This isn't a problem in-use as the softer lead conforms to the leade and rifling fairly easily, but in a tighter gauge they may stick.

The 40XL gauge is designed with a bit more room for lead and coated-lead rounds and is the suggested alternative to the 40L.

A few of our customers that load oversize lead bullets instead of dropping the loaded rounds in bullet-first where they will stick, drop them in the gauge base-first (this works best with .40 and .45 ACP). This doesn't check the bullet itself at all, but verifies the case is not bulged, which is usually what causes 40 caliber 'death jams'.

​Troubleshooting ammunition that doesn't fit the gauge.
 

We often see the same reasons for ammunition not fitting the gauge and here's how to identify and fix them--

(As an aside, we have measured several commercial gauges to be quite a bit over SAAMI minimum specifications. Just because a round passes one of these gauges and not ours is not necessarily an indication our gauge is out of spec.)

First, get some new factory ammunition (not even factory-reloads) and try dropping that into the gauge. It should 'plunk' nicely in to every hole. Every gauge is tested before shipping with factory ammunition so this will verify if the gauge is still in-spec.

If all your ammunition sticks out about the same amount, it is often OAL or crimp. Take a Sharpie or other ink marker and mark up a few of your rounds that don't fit, all over the front half of the case and bullet, drop them into the gauge and give them a light push. Push them back out and examine them carefully to see where the ink has rubbed or scraped off.

If you see a mark on the bullet where it starts to taper down, your bullet OAL is too long for the gauge/chamber.

Solution: Load shorter so the bullet is within SAAMI specs or get an XL gauge if your barrel permits it.

If you see a mark right at the mouth of the brass, you have insufficient crimp or your brass is too long.

Solution: Measure and trim brass as necessary, increase crimp if needed.

If a lot of your ammunition sticks out more or less random amounts, it could be insufficiently-resized brass, slightly oversize bullets or dirt and dust in the gauge.

First try rinsing out the gauge with water and a cloth or compressed air and try again. A soft cleaning brush can also be used, but metal brushes should be avoided as they can scratch the holes.  Gun cleaning solvents that do not attack aluminum may also be used carefully.

If this doesn't improve things, take some re-sized unprimed brass and drop the empty brass into the gauge to verify your brass is being sized sufficiently. It should drop in and out easily, if not, check your dies and reloading setup. Brass fired in oversize and unsupported chambers will often appear to have a 'belt' at the base where the reloading dies can't reach and will not fit the gauge or your barrel. Roll-sizing the brass can repair this but beware of overworking the brass.

If the brass is being sized correctly, try marking up a few bullets on loaded rounds that don't fit as above with an ink marker and press them lightly into the gauge (often this will push the round all the way into the gauge). Remove them and inspect them carefully and if you see scrape marks in different locations on different bullets, it is likely the bullet is slightly large or out of round. This is quite common with lead and coated/plated lead bullets and not usually a problem except in gauging. If this ammunition works well in your firearm, you can live with pressing them slightly into the gauge or get an XL gauge designed for lead and coated lead bullets and use that. If you have access to an accurate micrometer, measuring the bullets at several places will also often show size changes.

If just one or two holes seem to be bad (ammunition that this hole rejects fits all the others), it could be dirty or damaged.

Clean it and inspect it carefully for dings in the rim area or debris in the hole. There will be tiny variations from one hole to the next, but they should not cause any issues like this.  We can repair some gauges depending on the nature of the damage.

If you still have questions, please contact us for assistance.

- What is this "Leade" you mention?

Leade is the taper at the front of the chamber that transitions the bullet from the chamber area into the rifling. It is also often called the "throat" Rifling lands are smaller than the bullet so they can bite into it and make it spin. The leade is where the lands taper down to meet the bullet. Leade is specified along with other chamber dimensions by SAAMI (see example below from .40S&W). Often the maximum OAL of a particular bullet is determined by where that bullet profile intersects the leade. This is important if you load your ammunition over SAAMI lengths. Without a correspondingly opened-up leade (also sometimes called barrel throating, which is not to be confused with chamber throating which takes place at the other end of the chamber), your slide can be slamming the bullet into the rifling (or worse, back into the case) every time a long round is chambered.

Most of our gauges have the first part of the leade reamed in by the chambering reamer and so will catch some over-spec rounds (Exceptions include the .40L and 40XL).

- Why is my gauge shorter than a loaded round?

The gauges are not OAL-length for several reasons, the main one being maximum OAL varies depending on the bullet profile, so we would have to pick one and it would be wrong for other bullets.

The reason for that is OAL is governed by two things--

  1. The maximum length that fits and feeds through magazines and action

  2. Where the bullet profile intersects the chamber leade.

This second number is what determines the max-OAL in many cases-- bullets with more of a cylindrical shape will hit the chamber leade and stop before a more tapered bullet does (see discussion of 'leade', above). This intersection is difficult to measure with calipers so the load books do the work and give reloaders an overall-length value to use.

For example: Hodgdon lists the OAL for a loaded 9x19 115gr Speer Gold Dot at 1.125" but a 147gr Hornady XTP OAL at 1.100". The 147gr Hornady is a truncated-cone design with a long .355 cylindrical section whereas the 115 Gold Dot is more rounded and can be loaded longer.

Our regular-size gauges (all but the L and XL) have the first section of the chamber leade reamed in so they will reject over-long rounds where the bullet profile won't fit a SAAMI chamber. The L and XL are designed for use in combination with firearms with extended leades.

Additional reasons to make the gauges shorter than a specific OAL value are:

  • Detecting under-length (and arguably more dangerous) 'short' rounds would be more difficult. By placing our gauge on a smooth flat surface under-length rounds will stick out less than longer ones.

  • Reduced material cost and weight for lower cost to you

  • Poking rounds out is easier

  • Decreases wear on the gauge if you load it on a flat surface as that takes the impact of rounds dropping in and provides consistent light insertion force lifting it up.

  • Easier to swipe a marker across the base of ammunition without marking up the gauge when it's on a surface.

- What ammunition boxes work best?

We designed the gauges to work with the most common square 100-round boxes, including Dillon & MTM. Berry's boxes also mostly work well. Boxes with slanted tops and special latches do not work as well. We suggest 100-round boxes, although some dextrous people can make two 50-round boxes work.

- What is the difference between the silver and black gauges?

The black gauges are anodized for longer life and appearance. The silver gauges are only surface-treated and are therefore slightly more accurate, but will wear out somewhat sooner (you should still get tens of thousands of rounds or more out of either). The black gauges have 1/4-28 accessory mounting holes while the silver ones mostly do not. Some gauges are not available in black for manufacturing reasons

- What is the difference between the .40,  and 40XL?

The 40 gauge is designed only for SAAMI ammunition.  Some .40s have slightly larger leade areas, but do not depend on that.

The 40XL is designed with a long-leade and a bit more bullet area than our old 40L gauge, so coated-lead, plated and lead bullets drop in and out more easily.  This is the one to get if you load coated or lead bullets on a regular basis.  You will however have to verify OAL yourself.

The .38 SC gauge can be used for .38 Super but it will not check for oversize rims and case length since the rim recess is not reamed.  We make a .38 Super gauge which is a better choice.  That will work for Supercomp rounds as well although obviously won't check the rim size.

 

 

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Average customer rating:
 
(2 reviews)  



2 Most useful customer reviews (see all reviews):
RufusP
Dec 2, 2018
Very impressed. Brass prep/quality control are by far the most tedious aspects of pistol loading, this has cut down on the latter significantly. Used the Shockbottle for 2000 rounds this week, I wish I had ordered sooner. Ordered on Black Friday, delivered Monday afternoon. Awesome turnaround.

Advantages: Way faster than plunk testing each round in your barrel. Easy to swap to MTM cases. Looks sexy on your loading bench.

Disadvantages: Cost
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Jeff Anzil
Jul 4, 2018
This unit functions as advertised.

Disadvantages: tight tolerances, double check tight rds. by using gun's barrel.
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